FAQs

Q?

What causes blocked drains?

A.

Almost every homeowner will have experienced some form of blockage within their home. With years of experience within the drainage industry, Burgess and Partners Plumbing Services are fully capable of spotting the most common and probable causes of such blockages. The most common causes of drain blockages:

Trees and leaves
Many homeowners are always be busy in the garden, carrying out essential garden maintenance to keep their gardens looking neat and tidy. Keeping your garden free from stray leaves and debris can also help to keep the issue of blocked drains at bay. Leaves are not the only culprit, as tree roots which are drawn to the nearest source of water can also crack into the pipes over time, causing a blockage.

Grease and fat
This is one of the most common causes, yet it is also one of the easiest to prevent. Any fatty substances which are washed down the sinks will stick to the inside of the pipes, eventually building up so much that no more liquid can pass through. This can be easily avoided by keeping a watchful eye over the liquids which you do decide to wash away.

Hair
A build up of hair can also pose a large problem for homeowners. Over time this can worsen if the blockage is not quickly cleared, preventing liquid from passing through it altogether. Although this can be helped by using devices which catch the hair before it enters the pipes, you should still pay close attention to this simple, yet avoidable issue.

Foreign objects
Blocked drainage can occur when foreign objects or materials such as soaps, fats or food build up become caught between the drainpipe and the pipes that flow underneath. Initially the material may not fully block the drain, but over time materials will continue to collect which will prevent water from flowing freely and could eventually cause the drain to block. Toilets regularly block up due to too much toilet paper, sanitary items and even nappies being flushed down them. Young children are often the culprits for blocked toilets. They have been known to flush a full roll of toilet paper, a toy and even the toilet brush.

Q?

What to do if your water pipe bursts in the roof/walls under a floor?

A.

Turn off the water at the mains. This will stop any more water leaking through, but you will have to allow time for the water in the pipe to stop. Switch off electricity to the geyser if you suspect the burst pipe is near the geyser. If there is a leak, especially in a ceiling, the water will tend to culminate around a light fitting. Limit the damage. If the ceiling is bowing, then to limit the damage from your whole ceiling collapsing, use a sharp implement or screw driver to make a hole in the ceiling board for the water to drain into a bucket or dustbin. Call Burgess and Partners Plumbing Services.

Q?

What to do if your water pipe bursts underground?

A.

Turn off the water at the mains. If you notice hot water coming out of the cold taps or in the area where the leak is, switch off the electricity supply to the geyser. Call Burgess and Partners Plumbing Services.

Q?

What to do if your water pipe has burst underground or in a floor or wall and is not visible?

A.

Common Signs to look for: If there is the constant sound of running water especially when it very quiet or late at night the chances are very high that there is an undetected water leak. A constant damp or wet area either in paving, tar, concrete or grass. Painted wall's that are damp and moist to touch especially behind bathroom and kitchen walls. Call Burgess and Partners Plumbing Services.

Q?

What happens when roots get inside drain lines?

A.

If left undisturbed, roots from shrubs and trees will completely fill a pipe with multiple hair-like root masses at each point of entry. These root masses quickly become clogged with toilet tissue, grease and other debris flowing from your home to the main sewer, resulting in reduced flow, slow running drains and in most cases complete blockage. Once roots have entered the pipe, they continue to grow and expand, exerting considerable pressure at the crack or joint. This increased pressure often breaks the pipe and may result in total collapse, which requires repair or replacement. Some pipe materials are more susceptible to root intrusion than others. Clay tile pipe is easily penetrated and damaged by tree roots. Concrete pipe and PVC pipe may also allow root intrusion, but to a lesser extent than clay pipe. PVC pipe usually has fewer joints and the tightly fitted joints are less likely to leak as a result of settlement around the pipe.

Q?

Why do I have poor water pressure at my taps and mixers?

A.

Try removing the aerator at the end of the spout and cleaning the screen of any dirt and debris. The aerator is designed to diffuse the water to prevent splashing, but it can become clogged over time.

Q?

Why do my pipes rattle when I close a tap?

A.

This problem is usually caused by the water lines not being properly secured. It can be easily fixed but only if your water lines are easily accessible. All you need to do is get copper or plastic pipe hangers that will secure your water lines to the applicable substrate.